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What are the different types of Diabetes ?

Broadly Diabetes are of Two types 

  1. Diabetes Mellitus (increased thirst and increased formation of urine related to intolerance of glucose)
  2. Diabetes Insipidus (increased thirst and increased urine formation related to deficiency of the pituitary hormone vasopressin, which regulates kidney function)

 

Diabetes Mellitus (or what in general is known as diabetes) is in turn of mainly three types: 

Type 1 diabetes (insulin deficiency) is commonly diagnosed in children and young adults, but it's a lifelong condition. If you have this type of diabetes, your body does not make insulin, so you must take insulin every day. Treatment for type 1 diabetes includes taking insulin shots or using an insulin pump, making healthy food choices, getting regular physical activity, taking aspirin daily (for many people), and controlling blood pressure and cholesterol levels.


Type 2 diabetes (insulin resistance) is the most common type of diabetes — about 9 out of 10 people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. You can get type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. In type 2 diabetes, your body makes insulin, but the insulin is not able to function properly and cannot help glucose in blood to enter the body cells. Treatment includes taking medicine which can improve the function of insulin or can increase the secretion of insulin or can in other ways help body utilize glucose, making healthy food choices, getting regular physical activity, taking aspirin daily (for many people), and controlling blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Over years, the production of insulin in your body continues to decrease progressively. Because of this there may be need to change or increase the dosage of medicines you are taking or even insulin injections may be required in later stages.


Gestational (jess-TAY-shun-ul) diabetes occurs during pregnancy. During pregnancy, the biological and metabolic changes in the body make it difficult for insulin to function properly. Usually a pregnant lady's body compensates by increasing the production of insulin, but for some females, about 1 in 20 pregnancies, women's body is not able to produce sufficient insulin to control blood glucose, and she develops signs and symptoms of diabetes. Usually diabetes disappears after pregnancy, but women who suffers from gentational diabetes are at increased risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes and should take precautions to prevent it.